Tagged: Economic growth

New publications from OECD, late September 2016

New OECD publications have been uploaded to the OECD iLibrary, a comprehensive digital repository of books, papers, and statistics from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Titles recently added include:

These volumes and more are accessible from the OECD iLibrary by WTO staff and WTO Library patrons.

New publications from OECD, early June 2015

New OECD publications have been uploaded to the OECD iLibrary, a comprehensive digital repository of books, papers, and statistics from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Titles recently added include:

These volumes and more are accessible from the OECD iLibrary by WTO staff and WTO Library patrons.

Dynamic estimation of the relationship between trade openness and output growth in Asia

This paper studies the relationship between trade openness and output growth for a sample of twenty-three Asian countries using both a static OLS and a dynamic ECM estimation models. At the country specific level, the findings of this study provide robust empirical evidence indicating that higher revealed trade openness is not the main engine explaining the Asian economic-growth miracle.

Full-text available in .pdf

Is Africa Actually Developing?

The results of previous time-series studies of the income convergence hypothesis indicate that practically no African economies are systematically closing their income gap with the rich world. This implies that almost the entire continent is not ‘developing’ in the literal sense of the term. We argue that this finding reflects the assumptions of the discrete-break unit-root tests previously employed and the sample period chosen. We re-assess the hypothesis for 43 African economies using Fourier-type unit-root tests and find that as many as 18 are currently catching-up with the US. However, most only began to do so after the mid-1990s.

Full-text available in .pdf

Domestic Market Integration and Regional Economic Growth—China’s Recent Experience from 1995–2011

This paper constructs an enhanced indicator for trade barrier and examines the endogenous relationship between market integration and regional economies across China from 1995 to 2011. Beyond the current literature, this study shows: the endogenous relationship is significant, reflecting a virtuous cycle; domestic openness contributes to the economies in the central region more than in the other regions; the feedback effect is stronger in the eastern and central regions than in the western and northeastern; domestic openness and regional economies are adversely affected by state-owned enterprises and government non-productive expenditure. Several policy implications relevant to Chinese economy are drawn from the findings.

Full-text available in .pdf

Development Aid and Growth in Transition Countries

Empirical studies normally analyze diverse and heterogeneous groups of countries, producing very mixed evidence on the effectiveness of development aid in promoting growth. We focus on whether aid promotes economic growth in transitional economies. We find that aid, on average, has had a positive impact on growth for this specific group of countries. This result is robust to samples, estimators, and the use of alternate instruments to address endogeneity. Aid effectiveness is not conditional on good policy and there is little evidence of non-linear growth effects arising from aid.

Full-text available in .pdf

Simulating economic growth effects on food and nutrition security in Yemen

This paper presents an innovative approach for estimating changes in a country’s food and nutrition security subject to economic growth and related income distribution over time. Specifically, we combine a dynamic computable general equilibrium model with household- and individual-level regression models and apply this macro–micro approach to assess the effects of Yemen’s crisis-induced economic recession in 2011/12, together with two alternative transition scenarios from 2013 to 2020.

Full-text available in .pdf