Tagged: Commodities

New statistical publications from OECD, mid March 2017

New OECD publications have been uploaded to the OECD iLibrary, a comprehensive digital repository of books, papers, and statistics from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Titles recently added include:

These volumes and more are accessible from the OECD iLibrary by WTO staff and WTO Library patrons.

New statistical publications from OECD, mid October 2016

New OECD publications have been uploaded to the OECD iLibrary, a comprehensive digital repository of books, papers, and statistics from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Titles recently added include:

These volumes and more are accessible from the OECD iLibrary by WTO staff and WTO Library patrons.

New statistical publications from OECD, late September 2016

New OECD publications have been uploaded to the OECD iLibrary, a comprehensive digital repository of books, papers, and statistics from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Titles recently added include:

These volumes and more are accessible from the OECD iLibrary by WTO staff and WTO Library patrons.

New statistical publications from OECD, August 2016

New OECD publications have been uploaded to the OECD iLibrary, a comprehensive digital repository of books, papers, and statistics from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Titles recently added include:

These volumes and more are accessible from the OECD iLibrary by WTO staff and WTO Library patrons.

Price and income elasticities: evidence from commodity trade between the U.S. and Egypt

Elasticity approach to balance of payments postulates that a country can enjoy an improvement in its trade balance in the long run if sum of import and export demand price elasticities exceed unity, a condition known as the Marshall-Lerner condition. Previous research tested this condition either using aggregate trade data between one country and rest of the world or between two countries and provided mixed results. They are all said to suffer from aggregation bias. To remove the bias, in this paper we concentrate on trade flows of two countries, i.e., the U.S. and Egypt and disaggregate their trade flows by commodity. The estimates reveal that the ML condition is met in 28 out of 36 industries that trade between the two countries.

Full-text available in .pdf

Exchange-rate risk and UK-China trade: evidence from 47 industries / Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee, Scott Hegerty and Ruixin Zhang

Recent years have seen a rapid expansion of studies that examine the effects of exchange-rate risk on bilateral exports and imports for specific industries. Since the underlying theory is ambiguous, each case must be studied individually. This paper considers British trade with China, for 47 types of product, over the period from 1978 to 2010. Consistent with the underlying theory, cointegration analysis shows that most industries register no effect due to volatility in the long run, while some trade flows are reduced and a handful are even increased. An analysis of industry characteristics suggests that while the type of good might play little role on an industry’s specific results, a product’s trade share does. This is the case for UK imports of Chinese goods, perhaps because large Chinese exporters are able to successfully hedge against exchange-rate risk. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

The paper arrives at two key conclusions. First, as has been shown previously for other country pairs, most industries demonstrate no long-run response to exchange-rate volatility. A fraction of industries are affected, and most of these effects are negative.

Full-text available in .html and .pdf